Perugia is a city famous for its defensive walls that surround the historic centre, a small miracle that hides artistic and monumental treasures at every turn and preserves the appearance of a fortified medieval town.

Furthermore, every year Perugia hosts Eurochocolate, the largest European chocolate-themed festival. If you’re planning to visit Perugia, we suggest that you do it during the International Chocolate Exhibition taking place in October, each year. You’ll find all the information you need on this website https://www.eurochocolate.com/

Worth a visit

Arriving in Perugia, you will find the car park in Via Indipendenza, Via Marzia (06121 Perugia PG) very convenient. From this point, you can comfortably visit the town on foot, taking advantage, if you wish, of the many escalators that are a free public transport system and provide quick access to the upper part of the historic centre.


Church of Sant’Ercolano

From the car park we headed straight towards the Church of Sant’Ercolano which has an unusual tower shape. The Church of Sant’Ercolano, dedicated to the patron saint of Perugia martyred in 548 AD, was erected between 1297 and 1326 near the Etruscan walls.

It has the shape of an octagonal, originally two-storey tower. Unfortunately we found it closed and we couldn’t see the interior, rich in Baroque decorations.


Porta Cornea or Sant’Ercolano Arch

After leaving the church on our left, we walked under the Porta Cornea, which is part of the Etruscan walls (3rd century BC). Like many other Etruscan doors, the base still shows its original structure.

In the exterior of the facade above the arch, there is a 13th century lion, a symbol of the Guelph faction and at the same time of vigilance and protection. The underlying steps used to be a slope from where the wagons entered the city markets.

La porta fa parte del Rione di Porta San Pietro, il cui stemma sono le chiavi incrociate, simbolo del Santo.


Palazzo dei Priori

From Porta Cornea we headed towards Piazza IV Novembre,where we were fascinated by the Italian Medieval grandeur of the Palazzo dei Priori, today seat of the Perugia Municipality, of the National Gallery of Umbria and of the two most important Medieval guilds: the Nobile Collegio della Mercanzia (Merchants’ Guild) and the Nobile Collegio del Cambio (Moneychangers’ Guild).

It was built in different stages. The first (1293 – 1297) involved, facing the Palace from Piazza IV Novembre, the left section of the building; the second (around 1335) involved the right one, built in place of the church of San Severo di Piazza and enriched by a three-arched portico.

Above the portal are bronze copies of the Perugian griffin and the Guelph lion (the original bronzes, 1271-1281, from Arnolfo di Cambio fountain, can be seen in the atrium of the building).


The Cathedral of St. Lawrence, Cathedral of Perugia

The Cathedral of St.Lawrence stands in front of Palazzo dei Priori. The Cathedral of Perugia was built in the 15th century to replace the pre-existing Romanesque cathedral.

The facade is characterised by a Baroque portal and a side one dating back to the ‘500s. Inside the cathedral there are a nave and two aisles of the same height, typical of Gothic cathedrals, and many valuable artworks.


The Fontana Maggiore

In the centre of Piazza IV Novembre you’ll see the beautiful Fontana Maggiore, a prime example of Medieval Italian sculpture.

The Fontana Maggiore was created between 1278 and 1280 by Nicola and Giovanni Pisano to celebrate the completion of the new aqueduct. It consists of two concentric polygonal basins, decorated with 50 bas-reliefs and 24 statues. The lower basin goes to relief scenes of the agrarian tradition, the months of the year with the zodiac signs, of the liberal arts, the Bible and the history of Rome. The upper tank is made up of twenty-four plates, separated by statues of allegorical and historical sacred figures.

The two basins are surmounted by a bronze cup and by a group of three “nymphs” who represent the three theological virtues (Faith, Hope, Charity).


The Medieval Acqueduct

The construction of the aqueduct, about 4 km long, started in 1254 and finished in 1280. Without the help of a pump or any other machine, a pressure forced duct was used to give water an upwards direction, an extraordinary hydraulic work.

In 1835 the aqueduct was casted off because of long-standing problems of functioning and maintenance.

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The Etruscan well or Pozzo Sorbello

Not far from the aqueduct is the Etruscan Well or Pozzo Sorbello, a masterpiece of ancient hydraulic engineering, located in the basement of Palazzo Sorbello.

This cistern well was built using large blocks of travertine and adopting the same technique that had been used around the 3rd-2nd century. B.C. for the city walls. It served for storing rainwater and was one of the main public tanks in town in the Etruscan and Roman times.

Le migliori cose da fare nella città dei Baci Perugina Italia pozzo etrusco in giro in giro blog

The Province and Prefecture Palace

The Province Palace was built after the Italian Unification over the ruins where the Rocca Paolina once stood. The building, with porticoes all around it, reflects the style of the public buildings of northern Italy, with all its symbols dedicated to the themes of the Italian Unification and to local history.


Carducci Gardens

Before leaving, make a quick trip to Carducci Gardens, right behind the Province and Prefecture Palace. The wonderful view over the town, the valleys and the mountains you can enjoy from the Carducci public gardens is not to be missed.

The park hosts a monument to Pietro Vannucci, known as Perugino and busts portraying other celebrated men. On the last Sunday of each month the trade fair of Antiques and Collectors of Perugia takes place here and in July the park hosts a session of the Umbria Jazz Festival.


The Perugina® House of Chocolate

From the artisan workshop of 1907 to the modern industrial reality, visiting the House of Chocolate is a great trip in the chocolate world: more than a century of Made in Italy. Besides the museum, you’ll have the chance to taste the products, visit the factory and stop to buy delicacies at Perugina® Shop.

End your visit to Perugia in an original way, enjoying a course at the Perugina® Chocolate School. This is the website where you can find all the information about the museum and the courses https://www.perugina.com/


What to eat

While strolling around the town and among all the things there to see, you’ll surely want to stop for a bite to eat. Among all the traditional dishes, we suggest the Torta al testo (made with flour, water and olive oil) also known as Crescia (a kind of thick and compact Italian flatbread) usually served with cold cuts, cheese and/or vegetables and many truffle recipes.


Walking route

Le migliori cose da fare nella città dei Baci Perugina Italia tragitto a piedi in giro in giro blog
Clicca qui per aprire la mappa con Google maps

How to reach the Perugina® Chocolate House by car or public transport

Le migliori cose da fare nella città dei Baci Perugina Italia tragitto in macchina in giro in giro blog
Clicca qui per aprire la mappa con Google maps

Take a closer look at the alleys

We suggest that, while walking around Perugia, you take a closer look at the alleys, as in each of them you’ll find wonderful Medieval arches.


Perugia is so much more than this, you’d need more than one day to see everything, as for many other places.

If you had a whole week off, you could plan to spend it in the beautiful Umbria, enjoying your time not only in Perugia, but also in Assisi and Gubbio.

You’ll love it!

Ciao da Cris e Marco del blog in giro in giro

Perugia is also known for the defensive walls around its historic centre, a small wonder of artistic and monumental treasures at every corner. It still looks like a fortified Medieval village.

Furthermore, every year Perugia hosts Eurochocolate, the largest European chocolate-themed festival. If you’re planning to visit Perugia, we suggest that you do it during the International Chocolate Exhibition taking place in October, each year. You’ll find all the information you need on this website: https://www.eurochocolate.com/

What to see

Once in Perugia, you’ll find it easy to park in Via Indipendenza, Via Marzia (06121 Perugia PG), from where you can visit the whole town on foot. You can take one of the many escalators, if you like, a free and public mean of transport that helps you reach quickly the upper of the historic centre.

Church of Sant’Ercolano

From the car park we headed straight towards the Church of Sant’Ercolano which has an unusual tower shape. The Church of Sant’Ercolano, dedicated to the patron saint of Perugia martyred in 548 AD, was erected between 1297 and 1326 near the Etruscan walls.

It has the shape of an octagonal, originally two-storey tower. Unfortunately we found it closed and we couldn’t see the interior, rich in Baroque decorations.

Porta Cornea or Sant’Ercolano Arch

After leaving the church on our left, we walked under the Porta Cornea, which is part of the Etruscan walls (3rd century BC). Like many other Etruscan doors, the base still shows its original structure.

In the exterior of the facade above the arch, there is a 13th century lion, a symbol of the Guelph faction and at the same time of vigilance and protection. The underlying steps used to be a slope from where the wagons entered the city markets.

This gate is in the Porta San Pietro District, which has the crossed gilded keys as symbol of San Pietro.

Palazzo dei Priori

From Porta Cornea we headed towards Piazza IV Novembre,where we were fascinated by the Italian Medieval grandeur of the Palazzo dei Priori, today seat of the Perugia Municipality, of the National Gallery of Umbria and of the two most important Medieval guilds: the Nobile Collegio della Mercanzia (Merchants’ Guild) and the Nobile Collegio del Cambio (Moneychangers’ Guild).

It was built in different stages. The first (1293 – 1297) involved, facing the Palace from Piazza IV Novembre, the left section of the building; the second (around 1335) involved the right one, built in place of the church of San Severo di Piazza and enriched by a three-arched portico.

Above the portal are bronze copies of the Perugian griffin and the Guelph lion (the original bronzes, 1271-1281, from Arnolfo di Cambio fountain, can be seen in the atrium of the building).

The Cathedral of St. Lawrence, Cathedral of Perugia

The Cathedral of St.Lawrence stands in front of Palazzo dei Priori. The Cathedral of Perugia was built in the 15th century to replace the pre-existing Romanesque cathedral.

The facade is characterised by a Baroque portal and a side one dating back to the ‘500s. Inside the cathedral there are a nave and two aisles of the same height, typical of Gothic cathedrals, and many valuable artworks.

The Fontana Maggiore

In the centre of Piazza IV Novembre you’ll see the beautiful Fontana Maggiore, a prime example of Medieval Italian sculpture.

The Fontana Maggiore was created between 1278 and 1280 by Nicola and Giovanni Pisano to celebrate the completion of the new aqueduct. It consists of two concentric polygonal basins, decorated with 50 bas-reliefs and 24 statues. The lower basin goes to relief scenes of the agrarian tradition, the months of the year with the zodiac signs, of the liberal arts, the Bible and the history of Rome. The upper tank is made up of twenty-four plates, separated by statues of allegorical and historical sacred figures.

The two basins are surmounted by a bronze cup and by a group of three “nymphs” who represent the three theological virtues (Faith, Hope, Charity).

The Medieval Acqueduct

The construction of the aqueduct, about 4 km long, started in 1254 and finished in 1280. Without the help of a pump or any other machine, a pressure forced duct was used to give water an upwards direction, an extraordinary hydraulic work.

In 1835 the aqueduct was casted off because of long-standing problems of functioning and maintenance.

The Etruscan well or Pozzo Sorbello

Not far from the aqueduct is the Etruscan Well or Pozzo Sorbello, a masterpiece of ancient hydraulic engineering, located in the basement of Palazzo Sorbello.

This cistern well was built using large blocks of travertine and adopting the same technique that had been used around the 3rd-2nd century. B.C. for the city walls. It served for storing rainwater and was one of the main public tanks in town in the Etruscan and Roman times.

The Province and Prefecture Palace

The Province Palace was built after the Italian Unification over the ruins where the Rocca Paolina once stood. The building, with porticoes all around it, reflects the style of the public buildings of northern Italy, with all its symbols dedicated to the themes of the Italian Unification and to local history.

Carducci Gardens

Before leaving, make a quick trip to Carducci Gardens, right behind the Province and Prefecture Palace. The wonderful view over the town, the valleys and the mountains you can enjoy from the Carducci public gardens is not to be missed.

The park hosts a monument to Pietro Vannucci, known as Perugino and busts portraying other celebrated men. On the last Sunday of each month the trade fair of Antiques and Collectors of Perugia takes place here and in July the park hosts a session of the Umbria Jazz Festival.

The Perugina® House of Chocolate

From the artisan workshop of 1907 to the modern industrial reality, visiting the House of Chocolate is a great trip in the chocolate world: more than a century of Made in Italy. Besides the museum, you’ll have the chance to taste the products, visit the factory and stop to buy delicacies at Perugina® Shop.

End your visit to Perugia in an original way, enjoying a course at the Perugina® Chocolate School. This is the website where you can find all the information about the museum and the courses: https://www.perugina.com/

What to eat

While strolling around the town and among all the things there to see, you’ll surely want to stop for a bite to eat. Among all the traditional dishes, we suggest the Torta al testo (made with flour, water and olive oil) also known as Crescia (a kind of thick and compact Italian flatbread) usually served with cold cuts, cheese and/or vegetables and many truffle recipes.

Walking route

Click here to open the map on  Google maps

How to reach the Perugina® Chocolate House by car or public transport

Click here to open the map on  Google maps

We suggest that, while walking around Perugia, you take a closer look at the alleys, as in each of them you’ll find wonderful Medieval arches.

Perugia is so much more than this, you’d need more than one day to see everything, as for many other places. If you had a whole week off, you could plan to spend it in the beautiful Umbria, enjoying your time not only in Perugia, but also in Assisi and Gubbio.

You’ll love it!

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