Gola del Furlo is a wonderful canyon located in the region Marche and worth seeing at least once in life.

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In the region Marche, in a stretch that runs along the Candigliano on the ancient route of the Via Flaminia, lies a wonderful canyon created by the continuous flow of the river. It’s a place between the cliff and the water, where the forces of nature prevail.

Between the municipalities of Fermignano and Acqualagna, in the province of Pesaro-Urbino, in the Furlo Gorge - whose name derives from the Latin "forulum", small hole, referring to the gorge created by the erosion of the Candigliano River, which flows between Mount Pietralata and Mount Paganuccio - the Romans dug a tunnel at the most difficult point of passage (next to an existing Etruscan passage). The tunnel was built in 76 A.D. at the behest of Emperor Vespasian to allow the passage of large chariots and war machines, and is still open to pedestrians and vehicles today.

In this valley, the rock walls plunge hundreds of metres into the water, forming a canyon whose depth was reduced by the construction of a dam in 1922, turning the watercourse into a lake.

The best way to discover this place is undoubtedly on foot. The reserve offers several itineraries and walks between the canyon walls, where you can admire spectacular nature and come face to face with golden eagles, peregrine falcons and grey herons.

You can also leave your car in one of the many car parks along the river and walk along the Flaminian Way, passing under the Forulus, the tunnel built by Vespasian. The tunnel, one of the most daring road works in history, was built in just five years, between 73 and 77 A.D., by chiseling out the rock, the traces of which are still clearly visible. 38 metres long, 5.5 metres wide and 6 metres high, up to the dam where you can admire the artificial lake and the breathtaking spectacle that the canyon offers.

Not to be missed

A walk down to the Fossombrone canyon, in the shadow of the Marmitte dei Giganti, the turquoise Metauro canyon with its unique charm.

With “Marmitte dei Giganti” (also known as Marmitte del Diavolo) geologists refer to deep depressions dug into the rocks by the river erosion in areas that used to be covered by glaciers. When the glaciers started melting, this created vortices where the water moved so fast that it could erode the rocks.

The canyon and its Marmitte dei Giganti are located in San Lazzaro, a hamlet of Fossombrone, in the province of Pesaro-Urbino. It can be found after a bit more than two kilometres coming from Fossombrone and driving down the Flaminia. If following the SS73 bis, you should exit at Fossombrone west, follow the directions to Urbino at the Fossombrone-Urbino junction and turn left following the road sign to San Lazzaro.

Along the road there is the so-called “dei Saltelli” or Diocletian’s bridge. What you can see nowadays was built by Mario Corrieri in 1946, as a plaque on the pylon reminds us, while the original, ancient one was destroyed during the Second World War. The bizarre name of “Ponte dei Saltelli” derives from the bunch of rapids and waterfalls, upstream of the gorge of San Lazzaro.

The canyon is made even more beautiful by the Marmitte dei Giganti, where the erosive action of the river has created rounded cavities on the banks, now transformed into small lakes and stretches of water. The canyon is made even more beautiful by the Marmitte dei Giganti, where the erosive action of the river has created rounded cavities on the banks, now transformed into small lakes and stretches of water. http://www.turismo.pesarourbino.it/

Enjoy!

Ciao da Cris e Marco del blog in giro in giro

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